Jessica Springman’s Intricate Art World

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Jessica Springman’s Intricate Art World

Meet Nickel Plate Arts’ August Showcase Artist

JessicaSpringman

Artist Jessica Springman

Jessica Springman was born an artist, but it took decades for her to find balance where the artist and analyst in her could co-exist and surface as her defining art style. The mother of two worked as a statistician and database programmer for some of the world’s largest media and market research firms before the artist in her really resurfaced.

Local Fishers art lover and friend Greg Farrell coined Springman’s style “Vennism,” defined by “breaking apart multivariate reality into constituent and relational elements as separated and nested 2-D representations.” Everything Springman draws or cuts is done entirely by hand using nothing more than a ruler, compass, pencil and pen. She rarely sketches. She sees the finished image in her mind.

The challenge, and excitement, is figuring out how to faithfully render her visions on paper. The mathematics behind her art is intense, but the result pushes her as an artist to find correlation between stark geometry and the irregularities (and color) of “life.”

Springman is the August Showcase Artist at Nickel Plate Arts. Here, she lets us in on her artistic life.

Cultural Influences: I have a passion for patterns, interlocking shapes, and the interaction of positive and negative space in design. I am influenced by architecture, textile design, embroidery and tapestry design, sacred geometry, and the visualization of mathematical equations and numeric patterns.

Artistic Influences: I admire the sophisticated, detailed style of artists like Jackson Pollock, Georges Seurat, Laurie Lipton and William Morris.

Work environment: I work primarily out of my studio in Noblesville, Ind. I enjoy collaborating with other fine artists and illustrators and art associations such as Indianapolis Arts Council, Fishers Arts Council, Hamilton County Artists’ Association, Nickel Plate Arts, and Carmel Arts and Design District.

Materials used: Typically heavyweight acrylic paper and illustration board, and professional-grade inks and pens, pencils and watercolor paint. Paper-cut artwork uses a standard X-acto craft knife.

Casey Kenley
casey@caseykenley.com